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Nancy Pelosi Talks About Jesus


Nancy Pelosi is talking about Jesus. Turn up the volume and watch the video below! The transcription is also provided. She made the comments at a May 6 Catholic Community Conference on Capitol Hill. (give the video a moment to show up)

"They ask me all the time, ‘What is your favorite this? What is your favorite that? What is your favorite that?’ And one time, ‘What is your favorite word?’ And I said, ‘My favorite word? That is really easy. My favorite word is the Word, is the Word. And that is everything. It says it all for us. And you know the biblical reference, you know the Gospel reference of the Word.”

“And that Word," Pelosi said, "is, we have to give voice to what that means in terms of public policy that would be in keeping with the values of the Word. The Word. Isn’t it a beautiful word when you think of it? It just covers everything. The Word.
 
“Fill it in with anything you want. But, of course, we know it means: ‘The Word was made flesh and dwelt amongst us.’ And that’s the great mystery of our faith. He will come again. He will come again. So, we have to make sure we’re prepared to answer in this life, or otherwise, as to how we have measured up.”

The Brody File would like to cut to the chase: The Bible says "The Word is God." It's right there in The Bible.

John 1:1 "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God."

John 1:14 "The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the One and Only,[a] who came from the Father, full of grace and truth."

A fuller explanation is below from Got Questions Ministries:

What do John 1:1,14 mean when they declare that Jesus is the Word of God?

Question: "What do John 1:1,14 mean when they declare that Jesus is the Word of God?"

Answer: The answer to this question is found by first understanding the reason why John wrote his gospel. We find his purpose clearly stated in John 20:30-31. “Many other signs therefore Jesus also performed in the presence of the disciples, which are not written in this book; but these have been written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing you may have life in His name.” Once we understand that John’s purpose was to introduce the readers of his gospel to Jesus Christ, establishing Who Jesus is (God in the flesh) and what He did, all with the sole aim of leading them to embrace the saving work of Christ in faith, we will be better able to understand why John introduces Jesus as “The Word” in John 1:1.

By starting out his gospel stating, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God,” John is introducing Jesus with a word or a term that both his Jewish and Gentile readers would have been familiar with. The Greek word translated “Word” in this passage is Logos, and it was common in both Greek philosophy and Jewish thought of that day. For example, in the Old Testament the “word” of God is often personified as an instrument for the execution of God’s will (Psalm 33:6; 107:20; 119:89; 147:15-18). So, for his Jewish readers, by introducing Jesus as the “Word,” John is in a sense pointing them back to the Old Testament where the Logos or “Word” of God is associated with the personification of God’s revelation. And in Greek philosophy, the term Logos was used to describe the intermediate agency by which God created material things and communicated with them. In the Greek worldview, the Logos was thought of as a bridge between the transcendent God and the material universe. Therefore, for his Greek readers the use of the term Logos would have likely brought forth the idea of a mediating principle between God and the world.

So, essentially, what John is doing by introducing Jesus as the Logos is drawing upon a familiar word and concept that both Jews and Gentiles of his day would have been familiar with and using that as the starting point from which He introduces them to Jesus Christ. But John goes beyond the familiar concept of Logos that his Jewish and Gentile readers would have had and presents Jesus Christ not as a mere mediating principle like the Greeks perceived, but as a personal being, fully divine, yet fully human. Also, Christ was not simply a personification of God’s revelation as the Jews thought, but was indeed God’s perfect revelation of Himself in the flesh, so much so that John would record Jesus’ own words to Philip: "Jesus said unto Him, 'Have I been so long with you, and yet you have not come to know Me, Philip? He who has seen Me has seen the Father; how do you say, "Show us the Father"?'" (John 14:9). By using the term Logos or “Word” in John 1:1, John is amplifying and applying a concept that was familiar with his audience and using that to introduce his readers to the true Logos of God in Jesus Christ, the Living Word of God, fully God and yet fully man, who came to reveal God to man and redeem all who believe in Him from their sin.

 

 

 


 

Print     Email to a Friend    posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2010 1:13 PM



Comments on this post

# RE: Nancy Pelosi Talks About Jesus

Oh Lord, please tell me this is not true and Pelosi and not trying to explain Jesus to the world. This is beginning to sound like a rough comedy screen play that has a never ending story. I pray that what little truth she knows is planted in her heart, and the separation of church and state applies to the federal government. Because I really don't think Jesus is in this debate.
Left by Carol on Jun 01, 2010 9:48 PM

# RE: Nancy Pelosi Talks About Jesus

I am not a supporter of Nancy Pelosi, however I have to raise the issue that though her speaking ability waned when she was not received with applause and accreditation for her use of an easily recognized Christian term as the speaker at a "Catholic Community Conference" was meant to publicly show her own belief as that adjoining those in the audience. I may not believe that she needed to explain herself so thoroughly, but when you are caught off guard by a low level of acceptance when you expect high praise (as she was at that moment) many people tend to get flustered and over explain.

I do not believe there is any fault here save for poor speaking ability on a poorly based cornerstone for a speech in that particular situation.
Left by E.Ryan on Jun 29, 2010 1:02 PM