Lorie Johnson

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Bath Salts: Don't Let the Name Fool You


There is a frightening phenomenon in the world of illegal drugs called bath salts. They are in essence a combination of methamphetamine and cocaine.

As you might expect, this super-charged speed makes people behave in the most terrifying way. The worst example recently was the man in Miami who ate the face off an innocent homeless man.

That's right. He literally ate the flesh off the face of another person. The image is so gruesome it's hard to believe the victim survived. He is now in line for a face transplant.

He needs one, as his eyes and nose are missing. It's like something out of a horror movie, like the work of Hannibal Leckter.

These bath salts make the user strong beyond belief. They also become paranoid. Worst of all, they become very, very violent. As you can imagine, this perfect storm presents an especially challenging situation for police. It often takes several officers to restrain someone who is high on bath salts.

They are called bath salts as a marketing ploy. First, the name is not suspicious, so people buying, selling, and just discussing it, are able to fly under the radar. Secondly, they are marketed as "not intended for human consumption" so the ingredient standards are not as stringent as for food and drugs.

They are consumed, though, making the user a danger to others as well as himself. In fact, people who have been admitted to the hospital high on bath salts, who, hours later have come down from that high and were released, have been known to go home, and commit suicide.

Another problem with bath salts is their illusive list of ingredients. The manufacturers keep changing the ingredients so that bath salts are difficult to detect and difficult to ban.

There is a temporary ban on them via the Drug Enforcement Agency. Congress is working on a bill to ban them but is having difficulty because of the slippery ingredient list.

There is no test for bath salt consumption so law enforcement and medical personnel have been relying on users confessing they took bath salts. Sometimes if there is no confession of use, officials simply make the assumption a person is high on bath salts based on their behavior.

The bottom line is, stay away from bath salts if you ever have the opportunity to use them. They do not appear to produce an enjoyable experience at all. In fact, based on police camera footage, the users all appear to be in utter agony.

Print     Email to a Friend    posted on Tuesday, June 19, 2012 11:52 AM



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